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published by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
supported by the International Business Machines
content provider: the New York Hall of Science
This resource is a standards-aligned lesson for Grades 4-8 developed to promote understanding of just how tiny a nanometer is. Learners measure common classroom objects and convert the measurement to nanometers. They also learn about electron microscopes and find out about products that have been improved through the application of nanotechnology.

Background information: Nanotechnology (Courtesy TryNano.org)

See Related Items for a Java applet to interactively view various specimens as they appear under a scanning electron microscope (SEM).   

This collection is part of TryEngineering.org, a website maintained by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Education Practices
- Active Learning
General Physics
- Measurement/Units
= Scaling
Modern Physics
- Nanoscience
Other Sciences
- Engineering
- Middle School
- Elementary School
- Informal Education
- Instructional Material
= Activity
= Instructor Guide/Manual
= Lesson/Lesson Plan
= Problem/Problem Set
= Student Guide
= Unit of Instruction
Appropriate Courses Categories Ratings
- Physical Science
- Lesson Plan
- Activity
- New teachers
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Safety Warnings
Minimal Danger   No Safety Equipment Necessary  


Intended Users:
Educator
Parent/Guardian
Learner
Formats:
text/html
application/pdf
Access Rights:
Free access
Restriction:
© 2010 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Keywords:
engineering lessons, nanometer scale, nanoscience lessons, nanotech, nanotechnology, nanotechnology lessons, scanning probe microscope
Record Cloner:
Metadata instance created April 19, 2012 by Caroline Hall
Record Updated:
September 21, 2012 by Caroline Hall
Last Update
when Cataloged:
June 30, 2011

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008 Version)

4. The Physical Setting

4D. The Structure of Matter
  • 6-8: 4D/M1a. All matter is made up of atoms, which are far too small to see directly through a microscope.

8. The Designed World

8B. Materials and Manufacturing
  • 6-8: 8B/M5. Efforts to find replacements for existing materials are driven by an interest in finding materials that are cheaper to obtain or produce or that have more desirable properties.
  • 9-12: 8B/H4. Increased knowledge of the properties of particular molecular structures helps in the design and synthesis of new materials for special purposes.

11. Common Themes

11D. Scale
  • 6-8: 11D/M3. Natural phenomena often involve sizes, durations, and speeds that are extremely small or extremely large. These phenomena may be difficult to appreciate because they involve magnitudes far outside human experience.
  • 9-12: 11D/H1. Representing very large or very small numbers in terms of powers of ten makes it easier to perform calculations using those numbers.

Common Core State Standards for Mathematics Alignments

Standards for Mathematical Practice (K-12)

MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

Measurement and Data (K-5)

Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit. (4)
  • 4.MD.1 Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two column table.
Convert like measurement units within a given measurement system. (5)
  • 5.MD.1 Convert among different-sized standard measurement units within a given measurement system (e.g., convert 5 cm to 0.05 m), and use these conversions in solving multi-step, real world problems.
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Record Link
AIP Format
(Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2010), WWW Document, (http://www.trynano.org/What_is_Nano.html).
AJP/PRST-PER
TryNano Lesson: What Is A Nanometer? (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2010), <http://www.trynano.org/What_is_Nano.html>.
APA Format
TryNano Lesson: What Is A Nanometer?. (2011, June 30). Retrieved April 20, 2014, from Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers: http://www.trynano.org/What_is_Nano.html
Chicago Format
New York Hall of Science, and International Business Machines. TryNano Lesson: What Is A Nanometer?. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, June 30, 2011. http://www.trynano.org/What_is_Nano.html (accessed 20 April 2014).
MLA Format
TryNano Lesson: What Is A Nanometer?. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2010. 30 June 2011. New York Hall of Science, and International Business Machines. 20 Apr. 2014 <http://www.trynano.org/What_is_Nano.html>.
BibTeX Export Format
@misc{ Title = {TryNano Lesson: What Is A Nanometer?}, Publisher = {Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers}, Volume = {2014}, Number = {20 April 2014}, Month = {June 30, 2011}, Year = {2010} }
Refer Export Format

%T TryNano Lesson: What Is A Nanometer?
%D June 30, 2011
%I Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
%U http://www.trynano.org/What_is_Nano.html
%O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Electronic Source
%D June 30, 2011
%T TryNano Lesson: What Is A Nanometer?
%I Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
%V 2014
%N 20 April 2014
%8 June 30, 2011
%9 text/html
%U http://www.trynano.org/What_is_Nano.html


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TryNano Lesson: What Is A Nanometer?:

Is Supplemented By Molecular Expressions: Virtual Scanning Electron Microscopy

A high-quality interactive tutorial that allows users to explore "specimens" as they would appear under a scanning electron microscope. Choose from a cockroach, pollen grain, diatomic molecule, jellyfish, and more.

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