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written by Tom Henderson
This is a five-part interactive tutorial for introductory physics on the topic of electric circuits, current, and power. It explains the following concepts: electric potential, requirements of a circuit, light bulb anatomy, current flow, and electric power, and common misconceptions relating to electricity. Each section contains self-guided quizzes that allow students to check their understanding.

The Physics Front editors recommend this tutorial not only for high school physics learners, but also for middle school teachers seeking to refresh content knowledge on the topic of current electricity.
Subjects Levels Resource Types
Electricity & Magnetism
- DC Circuits
- High School
- Middle School
- Instructional Material
= Problem/Problem Set
= Tutorial
Appropriate Courses Categories Ratings
- Physical Science
- Physics First
- Conceptual Physics
- Algebra-based Physics
- AP Physics
- Activity
- Assessment
- New teachers
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Intended Users:
Learner
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Formats:
text/html
image/gif
Access Rights:
Free access
Restriction:
© 1996 Tom Henderson
Keywords:
circuits, current, electric current, electric potential, electric power, electricity tutorial, interactive tutorial, kilowatt, tutorial
Record Cloner:
Metadata instance created June 18, 2010 by Caroline Hall
Record Updated:
June 27, 2011 by Tom Henderson
Last Update
when Cataloged:
December 12, 2008

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008 Version)

8. The Designed World

8C. Energy Sources and Use
  • 6-8: 8C/M4. Electrical energy can be generated from a variety of energy resources and can be transformed into almost any other form of energy. Electric circuits are used to distribute energy quickly and conveniently to distant locations.

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (1993 Version)

4. THE PHYSICAL SETTING

G. Forces of Nature
  • 4G (9-12) #4.  Different kinds of materials respond differently to electric forces. In conducting materials such as metals, electric charges flow easily, whereas in insulating materials such as glass, they can move hardly at all. At very low temperatures, some materials become superconductors and offer no resistance to the flow of current. In between these extremes, semiconducting materials differ greatly in how well they conduct, depending on their exact composition.
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Record Link
AIP Format
T. Henderson, (1996), WWW Document, (http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/U9L2a.cfm).
AJP/PRST-PER
T. Henderson, The Physics Classroom: What is an Electric Circuit? (1996), <http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/U9L2a.cfm>.
APA Format
Henderson, T. (2008, December 12). The Physics Classroom: What is an Electric Circuit?. Retrieved July 23, 2014, from http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/U9L2a.cfm
Chicago Format
Henderson, Tom. The Physics Classroom: What is an Electric Circuit?. December 12, 2008. http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/U9L2a.cfm (accessed 23 July 2014).
MLA Format
Henderson, Tom. The Physics Classroom: What is an Electric Circuit?. 1996. 12 Dec. 2008. 23 July 2014 <http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/U9L2a.cfm>.
BibTeX Export Format
@misc{ Author = "Tom Henderson", Title = {The Physics Classroom: What is an Electric Circuit?}, Volume = {2014}, Number = {23 July 2014}, Month = {December 12, 2008}, Year = {1996} }
Refer Export Format

%A Tom Henderson
%T The Physics Classroom: What is an Electric Circuit?
%D December 12, 2008
%U http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/U9L2a.cfm
%O text/html

EndNote Export Format

%0 Electronic Source
%A Henderson, Tom
%D December 12, 2008
%T The Physics Classroom: What is an Electric Circuit?
%V 2014
%N 23 July 2014
%8 December 12, 2008
%9 text/html
%U http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/U9L2a.cfm


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The Physics Classroom: What is an Electric Circuit?:

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